Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007)
Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, From right to left (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007)
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Open and shut (2007), detail
Julie Brooke, Apple of my eye (2007)
   
  
 
  
    
  
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     I started making these works as a way of exploring the relationship between photography and painting.  I saw the bowl of the spoon as analogous to the interior retinal surface of the eye, which receives the image of whatever it is we're looking at, and making paintings of the convex eye on this concave surface presented an interesting challenge.  These works also reference the idea of the    optogram   , the image that forms on the retina of the eye.  In the late Victorian era, it was believed by some that the eye could retain this image after death, a false belief that led to the idea that a retinal image, if developed like a photographic film, could provide evidence in murder trials.
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